Security Dynamics in the South Caucasus since Independence: Interconnected Threats and Security Interdependence

The article examines the security dynamics in the South Caucasus using the Copenhagen School’s Regional Security Complex theory, and seeks to uncover why and how the security of the three regional countries is interconnected and influenced by the region itself and its immediate neighborhood. It views the region as a distinct security complex, and argues that the South Caucasus can be best characterized as a region if viewed through the lens of security. Any major security dynamic affecting one of the three countries of the South Caucasus has clear implications for the remaining two. As small countries with limited capabilities, interests and agendas, the major security environment of the South Caucasus states is the region itself and its neighborhood, including immediate neighbors such as Russia, Turkey and Iran. The US, as the world’s only superpower, also has certain security interests in and interactions with the South Caucasus.

Authors: Azad Garibov
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